Category Archives: Book Reviews

Book Review: The Milepost, 2013

milepost

Reviewed by Susan Frissell

Again, we are reviewing the largest book ever on the Alaska Highway (Denali) and northwestern Canada and its environs (and on any bookshelf), The Milepost. With some updates, the new 2013 version is every bit as comprehensive and invaluable as it has ever been. We reiterate: Anyone traveling to Alaska cannot make this trek without The Milepost in tow. There isn’t anything it does not contain and even with today’s ability to quickly connect to Google, one still needs a good navigation guide such as this.

Since 1949, The Milepost has been guiding visitors and adventurers alike along the Alaska route and up through Canada. This is a trip of a lifetime and I don’t know how my friend and I would have survived without our trusty copy of The Milepost years back. At the time of our trip in 1972, our copy was a 9×12 paperback. Not nearly as voluminous and packed full as today’s edition. Nevertheless, it was a must. I still have my old Milepost, with its dog-eared pages and notes I made back when. I look at it from time to time to jog my memory and take me back.

As its editor Kris Valencia notes, “Traveling the Alaska Highway is worth the price, and the memories are worth the mileage.”

Covering some 14,000 miles of road, The Milepost lists detailed descriptions of all the communities along the route, a mile-by-mile log of all Northern routes and attractions in both Alaska and northwestern Canada. When traveling the Alaska Highway, we found these logs extremely helpful; particularly, when in need of a fuel stop and/or eating establishment. We had our camping sites scheduled ahead of time, which helped, but referred to The Milepost time after time when searching for suggestions about where to stop.

As I did before traveling in Alaska, The Milepost recommends all travelers carefully plan their itineraries ahead of time. For instance, if you are traveling in a good size RV, you will find there are extended parking areas available most everywhere along the way. Travelers can also combine road travel with the Alaska state ferry system and the Alaska Railroad.

Readers and travelers needn’t purchase The Milepost only if they are planning a trip to Alaska. On the contrary, for the armchair traveler alike, The Milepost is just great fun to read and peruse. There is so much contained in this travel planner, it is great reading. You will learn a tremendous amunt about Alaska from what remains “the Bible of the north.”

We can’t recommend it enough.

Book Review: Treasure Box of Classic Woodys

 

Sebastopol, CA Fetherston Publishing has published a limited edition “treasure box” that will rev the engine of any die-hard classic automobile fan. When it comes to the history of automobiles, Fetherston Publishing has captured the history, spirit and beauty of Woodys. In fact, their celebrated 400-page book has already achieved a string of five-star reviews from some of the automobile world’s most respected critics.

Wanting to offer something even more special to the woody fan, Featherston is today announcing a limited run of their exclusive Treasure Box of Classic Woodys swag.

At the heart of the package is a 400-page book, including 19 chapters, capturing not only the history of OEM station wagons, sedans, and convertibles, but also numerous one-offs, special builds, hot rods and even a chapter on the fake (aka wallpaper) Woodys of the fifties, sixties and seventies.

Opening out to 24×12 inches, readers can enjoy learning about the history of woody wagons built by Buick, Chevrolet, Chrysler Town and Country, Chrysler, Dodge and DeSoto, Ford, Mercury, Packard, Plymouth, Studebaker, International, Hot Rod Woodys and Surf Decals. Minor American makes, including American Bantam, Keller, Willys, Hudson, Nash and even Reo are also covered. There’s a chapter on types of trees used to build Woodys, and also on the decals of the world of surfing.

Fetherston’s Treasure Box of Classic Woodys is delivered in a custom maple and mahogany box, which resembles a woody tailgate. The presentation includes the book, a Dime Store toy woody wagon, a wood sample set, vintage and contemporary surf decals, classic woody postcards, and two genuine postage stamps for inclusion in the frontispiece.

David Fetherston call this book ‘The Last Great Woody Book’! As Fetherston notes, printed books are disappearing, and to produce such a book, complete with woody history and nearly 800 images, is unheard of with this type of publication.”

This intriguing and highly valued boxed set offers something extra special for the Woody fan this Christmas. It is priced at $459 (including free domestic shipping). The print run was only 500, so with this short supply in mind, Fetherston urges woody enthusiasts to act fast to avoid disappointment.

For more information, please visit: http://www.dfwoodybook.com

Contact

David Fetherston

707-478-3413

Book Reviews

Jim Davidson. 75 Ways to Save Gas (Penguin Bks, 2009). 131 pages.

75 Ways to Save Gas is the little bible to keep in your car’s glove compartment in these frugal times. Davidson has several ideas about how to get the best fuel economy from your vehicle, from the obvious suggestions: Use cruise control, keep off the brake and don’t speed, to the not-so-obvious: Wear appropriate clothing to don’t overfill the gas tank.

Davidson’s book contains a glossary of internet resources to help save fuel and money, environmental sites and automobile clubs. Also included is a MPG log sheet to track your mileage and fuel economy, as well as a cost of fuel appendix.

Some of Davidson’s tips include such ideas as driving in the slipstream-don’t tailgate but instead get behind a big truck; anticipate the green lights; buy a light-colored car and listen to calm music.

 

 

 

 

 

Book Reviews

The Milepost, 2012, 64th edition, Valencia, Kris, Editor, 8 1/2×11, 784 pages, $29.95 paperback ($34.95 Canadian). Digital Edition Free with book. ISBN: 978-1-8921542-9-3

Reviewed by: Susan Frissell, Ph.D., Publisher, www.womenwithwheels.com

This may be the biggest book you’ve ever read. It is also, by far, the most comprehensive and invaluable tome when navigating the Alaska Highway. When traveling throughout Alaska and northwestern Canada, The Milepost, a much-needed Bible since 1949, is the book to have under your arm-or car seat.

In its 64th edition, The Milepost is the “essential guide” for Alaska travelers, since 1949. This edition is edited by Kris Valencia, and with nearly 700 color photos and 100 maps to edit, her job is a big one. According to Valencia, “traveling the Alaska Highway is worth the price, and the memories are worth the mileage.”

This reviewer can attest to that. Taking off on my big adventure in 1972, a friend and I traveled from Chicago, IL to Fairbanks, AK and back. With dozens of stops along the way-and only one flat tire-we drove 28,500 miles in 28 days.  At that time, the famous Highway was not all paved; much of it gravel. Now, the Highway is paved, all    miles of it, which probably means the trip is a little faster.

Covering some 14,000 miles of road, The Milepost lists detailed descriptions of all the communities along the way, a mile-by-mile log of all Northern routes and attractions in both Alaska and northwestern Canada. When traveling the Alaska Highway, we found the mile-by-mile logs extremely helpful; particularly, when in need of a fuel stop and/or eating establishment. We had our camping sites scheduled ahead of time, which helped, but referred to Milepost time after time when searching for suggestions about where to stop and/or eat.  I have kept my original Milepost, which in the 1970s was a considerably smaller version.

As I did when traveling in Alaska, The Milepost recommends all travelers carefully plan their itineraries ahead of time. For instance, if you are traveling in a good size RV, you will find there are extended parking areas available most everywhere along the way.  Travelers can also combine road travel with the Alaska state ferry system and the Alaska Railroad. We tried booking the Ferry before we left town and even at that time, there was no more room available. In 2012, I suspect this is more of a problem, due to far more travelers to Alaska.

Readers and travelers needn’t purchase The Milepost only if they are planning a trip to Alaska. On the contrary, for the armchair traveler alike, The Milepost is just great fun to read and peruse. There is so much contained in this travel planner, it is great reading. You will learn a lot.

Available in bookstores, The Milepost can also be purchased online at http://shop.themilepost.com and amazon.com. Or call 1-800-726-4707. And if you are interested in blogging your travels to the great state of Alaska, go to www.themilepost.com.