2018 Toyota C-HR XLE

Susan Frissell,Publisher
womenwithwheels.com

Some may find the new Toyota C-HR compact SUV quirky and without a market, but we thought it handled well, provided a quiet, smooth ride and offers something a tad different from the business-as-usual SUV’s out there today. We enjoyed our week in the all-new Toyota product.

Competing with several more vehicles than we expected, the C-HR will win points for being a Toyota-in many shoppers minds, that is. Competitors include the obvious Nissan Juke, and Kia Soul. Perhaps the not so obvious include the Chevrolet Trax and Fiat 500X. Jeep Renegade, Mazda CX3 and Nissan Rogue Sport, are also on the list, as well as the Honda HR-V.

A lot of choices in the friendly-size category these days, although this writer isn’t just sure how anyone opting for this style SUV would do so when opting for more space. True, one does sit up higher, which is a big appeal for shoppers, women especially.

Seating for five makes the C-HR, a subcompact crossover, plausable, and may attract plenty of would-be RAV4 buyers. The price is right (starting at $22,500), and no doubt, one can easily drive and park this smaller SUV with much ease. The C-HR came to be when Scion was still imagining desirable vehicles, and thought they needed to contribute a compact SUV. Now badged a Toyota, the new C-HR has become the manufacturer’s most affordable SUV.

Although some may think the new C-HR doesn’t offer as much as some of its competition, we disagree. We believe it offers just enough. Not one who appreciates all the high-tech features in today’s automobiles, we’re happy to have just some basics. And that is not to say the C-HR only offers the ‘basics.’

The C-HR’s powertrain, with a 2.-0-liter, 4-cylinder, 144 horsepower and 139 lb. ft. torque, seems just right, unless you’re expecting more. We found it adequate for most driving. Matched with Toyota’s CVT transmission, the ride is sure and steady, with just enough acceleration to power this compact SUV. Noise and vibration levels, we found, weren’t near as noticeable as expected they might be. This was a surprise, and when it happens, almost always a surprise since today’s cars are so quiet.

The moment we climbed into the C-HR, we found it comfortable, quieter-than-expected and easy to maneuver. My sister owns two Kia Soul’s and the C-HR feels similar. Rear seat room for passengers is adequate with plenty of legroom. Unless someone is hovering over six feet tall, most can be accommodated in the backseat. Rear-seat legroom is commendable and we kind of like that high-placed rear door handle!

Some criticism has been thrown at the ‘weird’ shape of the C-HR. We liked it right out of the box. We didn’t receive any negative comments from riders or spectators, but other writers have reported some. Actually, it’s kind of refreshing to have a vehicle available that doesn’t resemble every other car on the block. Ok, for some, it may look disproportioned with its big rear-end and bulging fenders. Perhaps like some designs, it takes time to become acclimated to it, but personally, I would rather drive something that’s different. We think of it as “distinctive.”

By comparison, the C-HR’s tech offerings seem inadequate, but as mentioned above, for us Baby Boomers, not having so much to keep track of is refreshing. The C-HR’s seven-inch screen is standard, devoid of Satellite radio, Android Auto or Apple CarPlay, or any kind of navigation. The radio is very small, placed high, and when going back/forth locating radio stations, one has to use an awkward button, seeking available channels.

The backup camera is located on the rearview mirror, smaller than most, and even though this vehicle seems to be directed at young drivers, there is only one USB charging port. Not that one can’t update a sound system, but drivers today have come to expect these kind of amenities.

Safety features on the C-HR are the standard faire, and include adaptive cruise, lane-keep assist, pre-collision braking, Dynamic Radar Cruise Control, and automatic high beams. No blind-spot monitor or AWD offering. Fuel economy isn’t stellar, but acceptable at 27/31 mpg. We didn’t test mileage on the highway, but averaged around 29 mpg. around town. Rivals like the Mazda3 (34 mpg. highway) or Honda HR-V (33 mpg.) do offer a little better efficiency, but the C-HR weighs somewhat more, as well; around 3.300 lbs.

Helping out with a slanted rear-end window is a rear wiper blade, handy during inclement weather. The C-HR is available in two trim levels: XLE ($22,500) and XLE Premium ($24,350).

Our test Toyota C-HR carried a MSRP of $22,500 (total vehicle price $24,318, delivery $995) and included three options, including carpeted floormats and cargo mat ($194), mudguards ($129) and R-Code Color Keyed Body w/White Roof and Mirrors ($500). We liked the two-tone color arrangement, although the body called “Radiant Green” is really turquoise!

Specs:

Engine: 2.0-liter, 4-cylinder DOHC, 16-valve, 144 hp., 139 lb.ft. torque
Transmission: CVT w/OD, intelligence and Shift Mode, 8-speed, FWD
Wheelbase: 103.9 in.
Length: 171.2 in.
Width: 70.7 in.
Height: 61.6 in.
Tires: P225/50VR18
Wheels: Aluminum 18×7
Gas Tank capacity: 13.2 gal.
Curb weight: 3,300 lbs.
Warranty: Basic: 3 yrs/36,000-miles; Drivetrain: 5 yrs/60,000-miles; Maintenance: 2 yrs/25,000-miles; Corrosion: 5 yrs/unlimited mileage; Roadside Assistance: 2 yrs/25,000-miles

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